How to avoid the maybe: 3 reasons why one needs to find the dragon in the sales process

Photo credit: Birmingham Culture

I have been busy recently and haven’t been writing much. As mentioned, this blog is more of a hobby for me than anything else. But I enjoy writing a post now and then. So this post focuses on one specific topic I’ve been thinking about since my last post (in other words, months!): how to find out if there is or isn’t a time frame within the prospect organisation that could drive the closure of a deal. In other words, what are the reasons to seek for the dragon in the sales process.

A what?

Yes. A dragon in the sales process.… Read the rest

Is Rapportive not working? Simple way to fix the issue.

 

Is rapportive not working? Since 25 October 2017, it seems it has stopped displaying the useful social card on the side of Chrome. It is well know that Rapportive is a useful as part of a sales stack. My first assumption was that the culprit would be Linkedin. I assumed they had cut the API between GMail and their social data. However, after digging into it, it would seem the culprit is Google rather than Linkedin.

UPDATE: There is a conflict between CSP and the YesWare. The YesWare extension needs to be switched off to enable the CSP plug in to work – and hence Rapportive.… Read the rest

Good sales ops helps making sure sales data flow efficiently. And 4 data types to track

Photo credit: Julien Chalendard

This post focuses on sales ops and how to make sure the data captured in a sales process, right from the lead gen stage, flows efficiently across the various parts of the process. And beyond avoiding data leakage, how capturing as much data early on can helps analytics even if some data pieces can be deemed not relevant initially. In this first post, I take the example of a sales ops process built around 4 services / technologies, I explain the 4 groups of data useful to capture and maintain for KPIs and reporting purposes. The second post will then explain how to put all the pieces altogether.Read the rest

High level thoughts and a practical tool to define or refine a value proposition with outbound

Photo credit: Tim Green

Joseph Priestley was a theologian, chemist, philosopher, writer (150+ books), in short, a giant, who lived at the end of the 19th Century. Amongst other things he is known for the discovery of oxygen though other scientists have strong claims for this discovery too (like many discoveries at this time). One thing which absolutely blows my mind is the prescience of on of his quote: “The more elaborate our means of communication, the less we communicate”. Absolutely fascinates me as this is such a salient point these days.

Communication is key in  sales process. For a business looking at building a value prop specific to a segment, a new country or a specific function (eg: HR, Ops, etc…), there is a need to talk to prospects and existing customers to understand their perspective.… Read the rest

Simple four points framework to avoid trying to “catch-up”

Photo credit: Adamnsinger

“Should we catch-up?” “Did you synch-up with your colleagues?” “When is a good time to synch-up?”.

As we know,  it takes a few interactions with a prospect to bring him/her as a fully fledge customer. When looking at moving prospects throughout the sales process, whilst it’s best to block a slot with the prospect for the next conversation, things never run perfectly and some form of chasing is more often than not inevitable. Above are some examples of the not so very good (understatement) follow-up emails that can be used. But how to avoid this? What are the steps to take to get the right information as early as possible.… Read the rest

Weekly round up: articles on pricing, budget and sales call analysis.

I call these posts “weekly round up” though, looking at when I posted a similar one previously, I should call it “yearly round up”. But anyway, I did come across two very interesting articles and one worth mentioning. One about pricing, one about budget and a last one doing some semantic analysis on sales calls.

The article about pricing presents the perspective of a pricing expert, Madhavan Ramanujam. Its core thesis is that companies should build product around a price, not around features. Whilst the article might be more applicable to companies building large scale consumer products (eg: cars) rather than, say, software companie, I have found it quite interesting.… Read the rest

When talking about your product to prospects can put you in trouble…

Photo credit: Phil

Greeks invented the democracy. And they had an interesting way of voting. They used beans. A white bean was a vote in favour of a motion, a black bean was a vote against. The vote had to be unanimous for the motion to go through. So should the jar with the bean topples and the beans fall down, revealing a black bean, it meant something had been revealed too early and the vote had to restart. Hence the expression spilling the beans…

 

Well, nearly…

This expression might not be entirely due to the Greek way of voting (it isn’t).… Read the rest

Three rules for good (or roughly decent) Linkedin profiles

Photo credit: Hey_aventur

Hello, do you search for a PaaS that can make sure your multi-dimensional marketing strategy optimised in the cloud?

Are you still here? Wow, I am impressed. I would have switched off if I were you (don’t, I stop the jargon now!). And yet, this is what more often than not we find in marketing literature. Technical jargons used for the purpose of either selling ourselves or the organisation we work for. Yet, as I’ve already mentioned, the main reason people buy is to address problems they have today or they know they will have tomorrow. It’s just human and we are all trying to make our life easy.… Read the rest

5 reasons why I benefited from proper sales training

Photo credit: Stephen Koigi

Education, education, education. Tony Blair used this motto consistently in his first campaign to get into power. And it worked. A few years ago, as I was getting seriously into front-line sales, I was struggling and was wondering if I should make this motto mine. I had some sales experience, more specifically “bizz dev” experience but no sales “education”. So I was considering if it was a right investment of time and money.

I went ahead with it and never turned back.

I am not in the sales training business but, having been through the motions, here are five reasons why I think it was indeed the right thing to do and why, anyone in a similar situation, should consider doing the same:

1- Do you have a sales degree?… Read the rest